A graphic for a Rethink return to work webinar

Returning to Work: A Conversation to Resume Regular Operations

To watch the webinar, please fill out your information below:

Returning to work will bring new legal and practical challenges for employers in all industries and geographies.

For this reason, it is imperative to have a plan in place while being cognizant of laws/guidelines to avoid any legal repercussions on your company.

Vanessa Kelly, a Labor & Employment Attorney and Litigator with Clark Hill, PLC, and Melinda Lapan, Vice President of HR Advantage Advisory, recently hosted a webinar to help businesses and individuals prepare to resume regular operations.

They discussed the following topics in detail:

  • Preliminary considerations
  • Preparing the workplace for safe re-entry
    • OSHA/CDC guidelines
    • State Health Authorities
    • Executive Orders
  • Hiring/Rehiring
    • Dealing with Workers’ Anxiety
    • Refusals to work
    • Telework, accommodations & leaves
  • Dealing with workplace exposures or workers who get sick
  • Takeaways/Action steps
  • & more!

About the Presenters

Vanessa Kelly is a Labor & Employment Attorney and Litigator with Clark Hill, PLC, a full-service, global law firm. Vanessa’s clients seek her experienced, confident counsel in addressing their employee management needs. She provides legal services including risk assessment and risk avoidance in employee terminations, accommodating disabilities, addressing workplace misconduct, protecting key personnel and proprietary information, performing reductions in force, and implementation of workplace policies designed to avoid disputes and comply with state and federal law, to name a few. Vanessa also defends employers before federal and state courts and civil rights agencies. Vanessa earned her J.D. at George Washington University Law School, and is licensed in both NJ and NY.

Melinda Lapan is Vice President of HR Advantage Advisory, a subsidiary of Clark Hill. HR Advantage Advisory provides HR outsourcing and consulting services. Melinda has over 20 years of Generalist experience in Human Resources, having worked in various HR leadership roles across multiple industries prior to joining HR-AA. She has a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree and she holds two HR certifications: the PHR and the SHRM-CP.


marketing your aba therapy practice webinar graphic

Marketing Your ABA Practice - Marketing in 2020 (Webinar)

To watch the webinar, please fill out your information below:

Marketing your ABA practice does not need to be complicated or complex. While digital channels such as social media, search engine optimization (SEO), email marketing and pay-per-click (PPC) are very important elements of marketing, there are components that can be done within your practice with little effort.

Before you consider diving into marketing, your mindset should be to focus on the customer. Here are some questions you need to consider:

  1. What does our perfect customer look like?
  2. How are our customers hearing about us?
  3. What are we doing to “wow” our customers?
  4. How are we communicating with our customers?

Jay Baer, author and marketing consultant, shared that 92% of consumers trust recommendations from people they know directly, and anonymous reviewers have a 70% trust rate when they post online about a brand.

Online reviews are extremely important for businesses, but it goes against the BACB code of ethics (Section: 8.05 Testimonials and Advertising). Does that mean we cannot market our business effectively? Absolutely not. 

Online reviews are important, but word-of-mouth is even more important. If you create an operational process around customers to “wow” them, you will see your practice grow.

What can we do to “wow” customers and prospects?

Customers do not need a lot to be impressed with a business. As an ABA therapy practice, you can try the following as examples:

  • Create fun and educational posts on social media
  • Check-in with your clients after two months of therapy and survey them
  • Send monthly email newsletters
  • Write them a handwritten note or letter
  • Create video or blog content on your website
  • Improve your website usability to communicate with clients and prospects

Let’s use us as an example. We provide monthly webinars on important topics that provide value to clients. Does this result in more sales? Maybe, but that is not the goal. The goal is to help customers navigate the ABA business landscape.

Next Steps

Before you consider hiring staff or an agency to help with your needs, check out our webinar with Glenmont Consulting. Pete Polgar, the Principal of Glenmont, will provide you with actionable takeaways. Enjoy!


a male and female cleaning a workspace

COVID-19 Return to Work Resources for ABA Practitioners

Many states around the U.S. have begun to lift restrictions following the COVID-19 pandemic, allowing more businesses and individuals to return to work over the coming weeks.

While shifting to telehealth has gone well for many, if you’re an ABA practitioner, you might be eager to get back into your schools or clinics, but it’s important to do it the right way to ensure your staff, clients and students are safe.

With that in mind, we’ve gathered several resources to help you do so, ranging from general workplace guidance to tips for healthcare professionals and more. Feel free to download the entire bundle here, or continue reading below for more information on each individual resource.

General Workplace Resources

Review these general resources that can be used to reopen public spaces, workplaces, businesses, schools and at home.

CDC: Questions to Ask When Reopening the Workplace

This tool from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) aims to assist employers when making decisions during and following the COVID-19 pandemic. This guide is designed to help protect vulnerable workers.

CDC: Developing & Implementing a Cleanliness Plan

Whether you are a business owner, run a school or want to keep your home safe, this guide will help you develop, implement and maintain a cleanliness and safety plan. At the bottom are dozens of additional resources compiled by the CDC.

CDC: Guidance for Cleaning & Disinfecting

Here’s a simple summary of the two above resources from the CDC, with tips for developing a plan and questions to ask when reopening.

5 Steps to Reopen Your Workplace

It’s important to follow recommendations issued by your state and local health departments when determining appropriate actions to take, and pay attention to these five steps.

OSHA: Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19

This detailed guide from Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) outlines recommendations and descriptions of mandatory safety and health standards. It is not a standard or regulation, and is not legally binding.

Responding to Staff Who Do Not Want to Return

Guidance to help employers and employees understand the application of new laws and how they impact them.

Resources for People with Disabilities & Disorders

Those with special needs might be especially at risk when returning to workplaces and educational settings. Review these resources for important information and advice.

CDC: People with Disabilities

Some people with disabilities may be at a higher risk of infection or severe illness because of their underlying medical conditions. Here are some tips to prepare and protect.

CDC: People with Developmental and Behavioral Disorders

Find out what people with developmental and behavioral disorders need to know about COVID-19.

Healthcare Clinics & Medical Offices

The following resources are specific to assist health clinics and medical offices reopen safely following COVID-19.

CDC: Get Your Health Clinic Ready

Follow these tips to get your health clinic ready to reopen. There are steps healthcare professionals should take before clients or patients arrive, when they arrive and after they leave, and medical staff needs to be trained accordingly.

CDC: Medical Office Preparedness Planner

While this CDC planner is specific to primary care provider offices, many of the recommendations and tools remain applicable to ABA provider facilities.

Additional Resources

Take a look at these additional resources for fire safety and vehicle cleanliness tips to keep everyone safe.

NFPA: Maintaining Fire Protection & Life Safety Systems

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) developed this guide to help commercial and residential buildings maintain fire protection and life safety systems where less personnel are present.

Vehicle Cleanliness Tips

Follow these tips to keep vehicle interiors free of harmful germs and other unwanted elements.

CDC: Shared Housing

A guide to help you plan, prepare and respond if you live in or manage a shared housing property.


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Free ABA Data Sheets & Forms

At Rethink Behavioral Health, we offer all-in-one behavioral health solutions for Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) providers. We believe that technology allows providers to grow quicker through efficiencies, but we understand some still prefer paper and pencil.

At the end of the day, we want to be a resource for everyone, because when it comes down to it, all we’re trying to do is improve care for those who need it. With that in mind, we developed several data sheets that ABA providers can use to track their data.

These free ABA data sheets are easy to download. We encourage you to customize each sheet to meet the needs of your clients or service delivery model. If you’d like to learn more about our clinical and practice management solutions, please contact us here.

To download our Free ABA Data Sheet, please fill out your information below:

What’s included

We’ve broken this bundle of free ABA data sheets down into two primary categories, they are:

  • Programming
    • Skill Acquisition (SA)
    • Behavior Reduction
  • Supervision forms

Programming includes any goals that are trying to be accomplished to increase a variety of skills, such as daily living, communication and social skills, along with behavior reduction strategies, which includes any forms dedicated to tracking challenging behaviors.

Supervision forms will include any Procedural Integrity (PI) forms, Inter-Observer Agreement (IOA) and other tracking forms which we’ll go into more detail on below. These are more for program and staff evaluation.

Programming

As mentioned above, Programming pertains to any goals that are to be accomplished to increase skills and replacement behaviors, and decrease problem behavior. Programming is broken down into two categories; Skill Acquisition and Behavior Reduction.

Skill Acquisition

The first component related to programming is SA. In this section we’ll review Task Analysis (TA) and Discrete Trial Training (DTT), as well as several methods of data collection.

Task Analysis (TA) Data Collection

Clinician monitoring parent-caregiver behavior with complex behavior chains use this method to break them down into smaller steps.

A sequence of brushing teeth, washing hands, then going to bed is a common example.

Additional steps and targets can be identified by understanding each step.

Discrete Trial Training (DTT)

One of the most common ABA teaching methodologies is Discrete Trial Training. It is a one-on-one approach aimed at teaching students new skills in a systematic way.

DTT allows for massed or interspersed trial options. In our DTT Data Sheet, clinicians can track up to 10 individual trials and track accuracy and independence in responding.

Cold Probe Data Sheet

Cold Probe Data Sheets are ideal for tracking skill acquisition with many targets within a program.

They allow the parent or therapist to probe correct or incorrect responses at the beginning of the session prior to teaching. This can be used instead of trial by trial data collection.

Rate Data Sheet

The Rate Data Sheet helps track both the frequency and rate of targeted skills. These two factors are related, but have different definitions.

Frequency is defined as the number of times something occurs, while rate is the frequency of that same activity over a specified period of time.

Interval Data Sheet

Tracking intervals allow for an observer to set any amount of time to monitor the occurrence and/or duration of a behavior, and is an estimate of how often behavior is occurring. This sheet has space to track 20 intervals, which can be defined as whole, partial or momentary-time sampling (MTS).

Whole means that a behavior occured for the entire interval, partial describes a behavior that occured at any point throughout that interval, and MTS tracks if behavior is occurring at the end of the interval.

Duration Data Sheet

These sheets allows clinicians and therapists to track the lengths of time of each occurrence of behavior for each skill.

Behavior Reduction

Behavior reduction focuses on any maladaptive behaviors targeted for decrease. The two primary sheets that will be used in this component are the Antecedent Behavior Consequence (ABC) Data Log and Scatterplot Data Sheet.

Additionally, the Rate, Interval and Duration sheets detailed above can be used for tracking behavior reduction.

Antecedent Behavior Consequence (ABC) Data Log

The log provided is an unstructured ABA data log, as opposed to structured. This log can be edited to create a structured data sheet per client, which can be helpful for parents and caretakers as it makes the process more objective. Parents can select from a menu of options as opposed to writing their own thoughts down.

ABC Data allows parents to see patterns in behavior, including challenging behaviors such as tantrums, aggression, self-injury, etc, what causes them, and what follows them. This sheet helps track a specific behavior during an activity, along with the antecedent (before), consequence (after) and possible function.

Total duration is also an important component to track here, as duration may decrease before frequency of episodes decreases.

Scatterplot Data Sheet

Our Scatterplot Data Sheet helps to determine behavioral patterns with regard to time.

These sheets allow clinicians to track when behavior occurs in 15, 30 and 60-minute intervals over a 24 hour period.

Supervision Forms

Supervision forms included anything related to Procedural Integrity (PI), Inter-Observer Agreements (IOA), and additional forms used for tracking, but not necessarily related directly to client behavior.

Their purpose is to record data on parent and caregiver performance, so supervisors can provide feedback to improve performance as needed.

Task Analysis (TA) Procedural Integrity (PI) Data Sheet

When it comes to Task Analysis, procedural integrity is essential. PI is defined as how accurately a program is consistently implemented as it was intended.

This method is used by a clinician monitoring parent-caregiver behavior with complex behavior chains and breaking them down into smaller steps. Examples include a sequence of brushing teeth, washing hands, then going to bed. By understanding each step, additional steps and targets can be identified.

With TAs, any type of skill can be targeted. Our TA PI Data Sheet allows clinicians to track trials for pre-teaching behaviors, in-session steps and space at the end for error correction.

Discrete Trial Training (DTT) Procedural Integrity (PI) – Data Sheet

This is a structured method for teaching a new skill. Because of this, it’s especially important that caregivers implement trials as programs.

It is also used to evaluate a parent or caregivers implementation of DTT trials. This free ABA data sheet tracks up to 10 individual trials, along with pre-teaching, within-session and error correction responses.

Natural Environment Training (NET) Procedural Integrity (PI) Data Sheet

Last, but not least, is Natural Environment Training. NET is less structured than DTT, and allows clinicians to capture teaching opportunities as they occur naturally.

A child may be able to learn a skill in a structured environment, but may struggle to generalize the skill in the natural environment. This is an important factor for educators to understand, so they can tailor instruction so students can apply lessons learned naturally.

Similar to DTT, this free ABA data sheet tracks up to 10 individual trials, including pre-teaching, within-session and error correction responses.

Inter Observer Agreement (IOA) Templates

IOA data sheets are designed to evaluate accuracy in ABA data collection and identify observer drift or bias.

With IOA data collection, two people will observe a child or client at the same time, and record data on the target behavior or response. Once completed, they will compare their data.

The process helps determine if behaviors are well-defined, recorded accurately and consistently. This is also known as program correctness, and highlights the importance of recording data accurately.

Behavioral Skills Training Tracking Form

The Behavioral Skills Training Tracking Form is used to teach a new skill to a caretaker or caregiver. This may be an especially effective method of training with telehealth services.

The instructor provides a set of instructions and models for parents what to do step by step. The parent practices while the ABA therapist or supervisor watches and provides feedback, and this process continues until the skill has been mastered.


Complete Guide & Resources for Telehealth in ABA Therapy

Introduction & Our Goal

Updated: 4/13/2020

No one was expecting the COVID-19 to force practitioners to provide from their homes. At Rethink, we have telehealth solutions integrated into our ABA practice management solution. For Rethink users, we have prepared guides and instructions on how to use our telehealth solution to conduct your remote sessions. We understand that not all of you are users of our platform, so we will be releasing content that can help support your operations.

Interested in learning how our solutions can help you? Click Here To Schedule Your Free Demo  

We are working hard to distribute the most up-to-date content that will help you transition your practice from in-person to remote sessions.  Our team will keep adding resources and sharing our knowledge as quickly as possible.

Please bookmark this page and check periodically for updates.


How To Guide Video

To Download Our Bundle, Please Fill Out Your Information Below:

Rethink Behavioral Health Logo

1. Rethink Parent Portal Task Analysis for Clinicians

This document is designed for clinicians to assist parents in the utilization of the Rethink Behavioral Health parent portal.

2. Rethink Behavioral Health Clinical Prep for Telehealth Services

This document provides resources for clinicians for setting up Rethink client profiles to provide telehealth consulting services.

Tips for Conducting Telehealth Consultation

This document provides general tips and suggestions in conducting telehealth consultations such as pre-service considerations, session format considerations, initial sessions, subsequent sessions, additional tips.

Parent Resources

This pack includes a Parent ABC Data Log and a Guidelines to Developing Behavior Management Strategies document.

Supervision Sample Templates

This pack includes an RBT Supervision Checklist (both PDF and an editable Word document), Performance Feedback – Supervision Consultation Form for telehealth (editable Word document) and BCBA RBT Supervision Session Note document.

Within Session Templates

This pack includes a Session Notes Template for Telehealth Consultation (both PDF and an editable Word document), Preference Assessment Checklist, Parent Strategies for Managing Challenging Behaviors, Initial Intake Notes Template for Telehealth (both PDF and an editable Word document), and various PDF and editable data sheets.

Guidelines for Practicing Applied Behavior Analysis During the COVID-19 Pandemic

These guidelines represent an expansion of some information that was first presented on March 25, 2020 in a live webinar hosted by the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts (APBA), titled “Telepractice of ABA During the Pandemic: Working with Health Plans.” (To access a recording of that webinar, click here). They are meant to provide general answers to some of the most common questions that have been posed to APBA since the outset of the COVID-19 outbreak in North America, and a framework to assist ABA practitioners in making certain decisions about whether and how to provide services to clients in the context of the pandemic.

Information and recommendations are offered in these areas:

  1. Determining if ABA services are deemed “essential” under emergency governmental
    orders or regulations
  2. Identifying and complying with applicable behavior analyst licensure laws and rules, in
    particular those pertaining to telepractice (i.e., remote delivery of ABA services via
    telephonic, audio, and/or video technologies)
  3. Using professional standards to guide decision-making about delivering services to
    clients
  4. Working with health plans and other third-party payers on the delivery of ABA services
    via telepractice

Source: https://www.apbahome.net/

Coming Soon!


social media platforms for aba therapy

Best Social Media Platforms for Your ABA Therapy Business

For many ABA therapy businesses, promoting their services is often done through traditional marketing methods and word of mouth.

That said, we’re seeing more and more practices starting to embrace online marketing initiatives.

You can’t talk about successful online marketing without the use of social media platforms.

Social media can be a powerful asset for your ABA therapy business and when harnessed correctly, it can exponentially grow your reach online.

If you don’t have much experience of marketing your ABA therapy business on social media, the thought of getting started can feel daunting.

To help clear things up and arm you with the information and insights you need, we’ve put together this guide.

Read on to find out about the best social media platforms for your ABA therapy business to use.

Why Social Media Matters for You

If your business wants to find new people to work with and new patients interested in what you’re offering, it’s important to reach out to people and to get your name out there.

Lots of daily activity that happens on social media, which is why your business needs to be active and part of the conversation.

Social media is about more than the normal personal things we all share, like what you ate for breakfast or what new album you are listening to.

It’s also space for businesses to connect with customers and to build a following that’ll help them grow over time.

With the right approach and quality content, you’ll connect with lots of people who wouldn’t otherwise have known your business even existed.

Identify Your Goals

Before you can construct an effective social media strategy, you first need to clearly identify your goals and what you want to achieve.

The right approach will only be found when you know which outcomes you and your team are working towards.

For some professionals, that might be about expanding your reach, for others it could be about recruiting or making industry connections and contacts.

These are very different aims and will require different approaches to social media.

The content that will land well with industry professionals will have a different, more specialized and informed tone than the content parents interested in your services might enjoy and benefit from.

Different social media platforms will be well- or not so well-suited to various goals and approaches.

Below, we’ll talk about the best platforms available and what they can offer below to help you get an idea of which of them will benefit your business most.

Which Platforms You Should Consider Using

Here’s more information about each of the top social media platforms, what they’re good for and why you should (or shouldn’t) use them.

From there, you can decide which you think will best suit your ABA therapy business and what you want to achieve going forward.

Twitter

If you have an existing audience, Twitter is a good platform to make use of.

It’s the platform to use if you’re looking to stay on top of trends that are being talked about by users online and around the globe.

If you’re not looking to make use of trending topics as a way of promoting your business, and don’t already have an established audience, Twitter is not the ideal platform for you to focus your efforts and attention on. 

If you use Twitter, be sure to stay on top of new conversations and remember to take a unique approach each day.

Trends emerge out of the blue, and if they’re relevant to your business, be fast in leveraging them appropriately to your marketing advantage.

Instagram

Instagram is the most visual social media platform, and that’s why it’s ideal for giving customers a glimpse of what your business does.

That said, it can be a hard platform to master, as a cohesive and visual aesthetic is essential.

It’s about creating captivating images that grab the attention of parents who might be interested in the services you offer.

It tends to be a younger audience on this platform, but there’s a good range of ages for you to appeal to with the right images and graphic content.

Creativity will be key when using Instagram, so don’t shy away from expressive content that goes beyond what you might create for other social media platforms.

It’s about drawing people in and making people take notice.

When you’re competing for attention on a platform like Instagram, only visually engaging and thoughtful content will cut through the way you need it to.

Facebook

Facebook is by far the biggest social media platform out there right now, and businesses of all kinds should be using it.

For the best outcomes, it makes sense to use paid promotions to increase the reach of your Facebook page and get more people visiting it and interacting with it.

You should remember that for many adults, a Facebook page will be the first glimpse people will have of your business. 

First impressions matter when marketing your business on social media.

Ensure your business comes across in a way that’s presentable and establishes a tone that’s appealing and appropriate for the audience you’re looking to engage with.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn is the platform to use if your focus is on recruiting new staff to work for your business.

It’s also good for making industry contacts that might aid your business in one of many potential ways.

Content produced for this platform should be professional and use a tone that suits that kind of audience.

It might not be a platform you feel a need to use urgently, but it might be something to look into when your business expands, especially with its organic reach at an all-time high.

Having strong industry contacts and a professional presence online within that industry is recommended to grow your ABA therapy business.

What to Post and What Not To

What you post (and what you don’t post) on your social media channels will depend on several factors.

It’s important to put in place a strategy that you can follow consistently, taking into account the aims of your business and what you want to achieve.

If you’re looking to connect with more parents, sharing content and posts relevant to them, such as articles or videos about parents of children on the autism spectrum, will generate more engagement and social shares.

Be Specific

It’s also important to tailor your posts and content to the platform you’re using.

Each social media platform has its own quirks and particularities, as we described above.

You should cultivate an approach that suits the medium for the best outcomes.

What you post on Instagram, for example, will need to be different to what you post on Facebook.

That’s because of the different constraints as the platform, as well as differing audience expectations.

Follow Trends and Leverage Video

It’s wise to engage with tending articles, topics and viral videos that have relevance to your message and the ideas you’re trying to convey to your audience.

Creating your own original content is important too, and there are many ways to do so.

When people are scrolling through post after post, video content that makes them stop and take notice, but it still takes a balanced approach to be successful.

Recognize Relevant Awareness Days

There’s an awareness day for just about everything nowadays, and they can offer fantastic opportunities for businesses like yours.

When a relevant holiday or awareness day rolls around, be sure to make the most of it.

Put your business at the forefront of the conversation that’s taking place that day and have pre-prepared content that people can engage with.

People will be much more receptive to your ideas and your messages when there’s a reason for them to do so, such as a day that they feel is important.

What Else You Should Know About Marketing Your Business on Social Media

Now you know which platforms to use and what type of content to post.

We have a few more tips that can help you be more efficient with your social content and engagement strategy.

Consistency

As we’ve briefly mentioned above, consistency is important when it comes to posting content on social media and marketing your business that way.

You want to make sure that people are aware of you and that they don’t forget your business.

If your posting is inconsistent or goes through long barren spells, people will stop taking interest.

That’s why it makes sense to create a consistent posting schedule, which you can easily do so with a content calendar in an Excel sheet.

Collaboration

It can also be a good idea to collaborate with influencers who operate in the same space as you.

Your business doesn’t need to be an island when it comes to marketing its services on social media.

You can often achieve much more and much further reach when teaming up with other people.

Automation and Scheduling

From a logistical point of view, you might also want to think about how your approach to social media marketing might be made easier.

There are lots of social media automation tools that will help you with that, so be sure to check them out.

There are hundreds of scheduling tools that’ll make your life much easier, and they’ll ensure that the consistency we discussed above doesn’t fall by the wayside.

Are you looking to grow the social media presence of your ABA therapy business? Let us know below!


ABA Therapy Claims Billing

ABA Therapy Billing Services From Rethink

ABA therapy billing services are now available to all Rethink Behavioral Health customers!

Prior to our billing services, Rethink customers only had the option of self-billing solutions. We have listened to our customers to fill a gap when it comes to billing for your ABA therapy services. 

Big or small, our ABA therapy billing services are built to scale

We believe that ABA practitioners should focus on providing care, not spending time reviewing payor contracts or following up on payments. While our ABA data collection tools, RBT training modules, scheduling and billing software improve your operations, billing departments may lag behind. A common reason billing becomes a burden due to external forces is when payor requirements are updated, and you get notified when you receive denials.  

You may have lots of questions, so we’ve listed some of the common concerns and thoughts our clients have below. Review them for help determining whether or not our services are right for your clinic.

Do you currently have an internal biller? 

If you answered yes, the next question you should ask yourself is “Does your current biller have the capacity to handle more work?” If you answered no to either one of these questions, then our solutions are a great fit for your organization.

Do you struggle in keeping up with payor requirements?

If you answered yes, then our billing solutions are definitely a great fit for you. Furthermore, if you are looking to diversify your payor mix in order to increase your clientele base, our team will help onboard your company with the new payors. Please keep in mind, we cannot negotiate contracts on your behalf as we are an extension of your team not a representative of your organization.

Are you looking to improve your cash flow?

While this is a silly question as most people will say, “Yes!”, one of the biggest benefits our customers see when they use our billing services is that we may help improve cash flow.  

Here's how...

We bill on a weekly basis and post payments once a week. In addition, our team reviews all denials and rejections. During our review, we analyze the reason behind the denials and we will address them with you to create improvements to reduce them. 

Is your billing department holding you back from scaling your business?

Customers that use our practice management solutions are able to scale their business without the worry of technology failing them. The benefit of technology is that it can scale as fast as you can hire and train new talent. Billing departments are vulnerable to scaling issues as it takes time to find the right resource. When you leverage our billing services, you can virtually scale your business as fast as you'd like without the worry of being backlogged with billing responsibilities (how awesome!? 🙌).

Do you want to ask somebody questions about billing or how to improve your process?

As an ABA therapy business owner, trying to keep up with client demands, insurance requirements, staffing efforts and other administrative burdens are not easy. Let alone, trying to create strategies around billing improvements. When you use Rethink’s billing services, you will have your own billing specialist will provide you transparent billing reports. Your billing specialist is your dedicated resource, they are there to help you grow and answer any questions you may have. 

For example, if our billing specialist notices is an increase in denials, they will start at the review of the data that is being collected by your team. If they notice inconsistencies in the data that are being collected they will notify you and provide you with guidance on how to improve. 

How much does this cost?

Our cost structure is aligned to the size of your organization and the volume of insurance claims. We would be happy to schedule a call to discuss options with you! To schedule a call with us click this link.


teacher sitting with boy looking at a globe

10 Things You Should Know Before Starting an ABA Practice

This article is based on our recent webinar, Entrepreneurship in ABA: Top 10 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting an ABA Practice, presented by Molly OlaMolly Ola Pinney, Founder/CEO of Global Autism Project Pinney, Founder/CEO of Global Autism Project.

If you are interested in learning more about how to break into, succeed, or grow as an ABA provider, you can sign up for our monthly webinar series, Entrepreneurship in ABA.

Starting a new Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) practice can be an exciting endeavor.

However, it can be also challenging if you don’t know where to start or how to compete against other practices that are already up and running.

Most practitioners undoubtedly start out with the idea to help others, but the reality is that many business owners fail for reasons including their inability to develop business know-how, a strong financial model, and an adequate sustainability plan.

To succeed in this emerging industry, you must learn it to understand the business side of your practice just as well as the clinical side.

The different facets can be overwhelming if you’re not already familiar, which is why we thought this would be a helpful topic to discuss.

In our recent webinar Entrepreneurship in ABA: Top 10 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting an ABA Practice, Ola Pinney shares lessons from her own experiences and offers insight into the top things every ABA provider should consider to protect the sustainability and scalability of their business.

“Our organization has spent over a decade training businesses providing services across the globe, and I can’t wait to finally share what we’ve learned with you!” – Molly Ola Pinney

Here are a few tips to take away:

1.) Have Focus In Your Business

You should have a really compelling reason for switching gears in your practice.

A decision-making matrix can help you look at the different things you should focus on like time, costs and staff buy-in.

You should also be mindful of your messaging, marketing efforts and strategic efforts to support your bottom line.

2.) Learn More About The Numbers In Your Business

Even if you have an accountant, it is important that you understand cash flow and can plan for the future.

Some business owners tend to make a budget at the beginning of the year and then randomly check it throughout the year.

A regular budget analysis and plan for cash flow will help you note how money is coming in and going out so that you scale and spend appropriately.

Investments should also have a return.

3.) Develop A Crystal Clear Mission

The way that your business is going to attract people is by helping others understand and support your mission.

Ask yourself if you know where you’re headed and how you’ll get there.

According to Ola Pinney, “The how doesn’t matter nearly as much as the when, where and why.” When you’ve figured out your mission, you’ll want to figure out your why.

If you don’t yet have a mission, sit down with your team and write one down.

Then figure out your verticals and your people.

4.) Make Good Staffing Choices

Having a strong vision or mission will attract people who are there because they want to be.

You need specific expectations, guidelines and go-to policies.

You should leave no stone unturned when hiring, which may include creating an employee handbook (if you don’t already have one) and running guidelines and policies by your lawyer.

Think about the culture of your organization and what’s important to you and the people who work with you.

Weekly reports and regular meetings are amazing tools you can use once you have the right team.

You should also have a clear disciplinary process in place and never forget to hire slow and fire fast.

5.) Make Sure You Have A Strong Digital Presence

Does your company show up on multiple platforms?

Are you using social media platforms and ads appropriately?

Remember that your image should match your voice, your people should see themselves in your practice’s page and your visual identity should be clear, simple and inspiring.

Remember that you are connected to your company, so your personal image matters too.

6.) Determine Whether Your Company Is Scalable

In order to make your business scalable, you need strong processes.

Documenting processes allow you to plug in to them later and keep everything in one place so everyone knows where to go.

You should also think about your team and who you need on your team to move forward.

7.) Time Management Is Key

Even if you don’t think you have enough hours in the day, you do.

There are also enough hours in the day to take care of your body, mind and spirit.

“A good way to manage your time is to block and tackle,” says Ola Pinney.

Think about repetitive tasks and ways to leverage your time.

You should also delegate more tasks to others who can perform them.

8.) Change Your Mindset

In order to get a handle on the things you’d like to do, you need to change your time.

Try on the idea that you are the strong leader of your business and then figure out if you’re the roadblock to your own success.

9.) Be Consistent With Your Marketing

“One of the best ways to get the word out about what you do, is by talking about what you do,” says Ola Pinney.

Effective marketing requires a commitment to growth and a voice that people trust and want to hear more from.

Listening to and implementing best practices also help to make your marketing efforts more sustainable.

10.) Go To The Source

There is a lot that you can learn from others, including competitors/colleagues within the ABA field.

Make it a point to network and have a casual conversation.

These are just a few tips of the many things you should keep in mind as an ABA provider.

Another tip would be to have a practice management platform in place to streamline your processes and promote scalability while still ensuring client success.

Our one-stop-shop platform offers Billing services, Clinical tools, and Practice Management tools along with RBT Training, VB-MAPP licenses, and more than 1500 resources/materials as curriculum pieces.

Schedule a demo today at your convenience!


a diverse group meeting in a conference room

10 Tips for Motivating and Retaining Staff

This piece is based on our recent webinar presented by Erin Mayberry, MS, BCBA, LBA and current Professional Services Consultant for Rethink Behavioral Health.

You can sign up for the monthly webinar series, Entrepreneurship in ABA, mailing list here.

Have you ever felt burnout at some point in your employment?

In one way or another, each one of us has experienced a certain type of stress that was induced at work or because of work.

In Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), staff burnout is an essential item that needs to be monitored as it can lead to high turnover and disrupt consumer care.

On average, a behavioral therapist costs an estimated $5,000 upon leaving the company, not including the money spent on recruiting, onboarding, training, etc.

Let’s find out more about the most common work stressors:

According to Schulz, Greenley & Brown (first published in 1995)1, the most common stressors are the following:

  • Organizational Context (size of the company, task ownership, staff compensation, leadership style)
  • Work Satisfaction (nature of work, workload, work routine)
  • Client Severity (mental illness, psychiatric tendencies, developmental disabilities)
  • Work Environment (lack of job clarity, difference in company/organizational goals)
  • Staff Characteristics (Role tenure, age, staff education)
  • Organization/Management Process (Organization culture, influences on leadership, lack of social support)

In addition, common work stressors according to Waters (1999)2 are as follows:

  • Relationships with Coworkers and Supervisors (unsupportive to collaborations)
  • Effort vs Reward (felt undervalued, overloaded with work)
  • Lack of Influence on Decision Making and Outcomes (one’s opinion is not valued or is overlooked)

A literature review of burnout research was conducted by Bakker & Costa3 in 2014 which focuses on loss cycles and loss-gain cycles of chronic burnout.

In the research, the loss cycle consists of the following:

  • Job demands are associated with physiological and psychological costs. This includes fatigue/loss of sleep and increased heart rate which may then lead to physical and mental exhaustion
  • Daily exhaustion has the tendency to impact one’s work performance, which may then lead to employee ineffectiveness

In the case of the loss-gain cycle, the following are considered:

  • Encouragement of personal growth by providing better work opportunities
  • Availability of job resources and versatility

So how should we mitigate employees experiencing staff burnout?

Here are some of the most effective ways to prevent staff from experiencing burnout in the workplace:

Set Clear Expectations

As leaders, being transparent is a key trait in gaining trust from your staff. The same is true with setting expectations for them.

You have to ensure that expectations are clear and defined in measurable/observable terms.

If there are expectations that cannot be met for some reason, there should be a contingency plan in place.

Provide Effective Training

Onboarding new staff is time-consuming and often expensive.

With that being said, it is most ideal to train them properly rather than being thrown into a new role with no formal training at all.

A structured training method such as behavioral skills training or a peer training program can truly help in achieving positive, lasting results.

Not just onboarding, professional development can increase employee morale, performance, and treatment.

Provide Frequent Feedback

Let’s face it – an employee will not know what he/she is doing is right if no one tells him/her about it.

Make sure to provide feedback to your staff regarding their performance.

Balance corrective feedback with positive feedback, and try to only provide positive feedback occasionally.

Utilize Peers

The best way to encourage staff, specifically if they are performing well, is by telling them that they are doing well, which doesn’t always have to come from leadership.

Colleagues/peers can also help you provide feedback to their coworkers.

This can be achieved through shout outs, peer training and observation, and feedback in the moment.

Establish Individualized Goals

Personalized goals are effective because staff have more buy-in and accountability when they are able to help create the goals they will be working toward.

Every staff brings a unique set of skills and characteristics to the job, so it is important to recognize that each staff person may need support in different aspects of their job performance.

Use Preference Assessments

Not everyone likes the same thing, thus diversity should always be one of the top priorities as a leader.

Staff bonuses may not be too enticing for some people, as they prefer more time off rather than more money.

In this case, it is always a must to practice avoiding assumptions, but rather be open to opinions of the whole staff.

Provide Incentives for Performance

Once you know your staff’s preferences, you may use them to provide performance incentives when they achieve the goal that has been set for them.

This may include money, additional paid time off, or anything else the employee may value.

Establish a Supportive Organizational Structure

If there is a supportive organizational structure, staff are more likely to work together.

A supportive organizational structure encourages open communication, respect across all levels of employment, and establishes clear goals and visions.

Encourage Self-Monitoring

By letting your staff measure their own performance, you have the opportunity to encourage staff to create goals for themselves and personally evaluate their progress toward that goal.

This is a great way for staff to have immediate feedback when leadership isn’t always available to provide feedback in the moment.

Model the Behavior You Want to Increase

The mentality “Do as I say, not as I do” is ineffective. The more effective way to lead is by example. Model behaviors you want staff to imitate.

You can also encourage staff to be models for their peers. Some staff learn best by observing a competent colleague demonstrate a skill first.

By including some or all of these strategies in the workplace, you can reduce the stress and burnout staff may feel on the job.

Not only will staff be more supported, their overall job performance may improve as well which can lead to increased client happiness.

Two simple, low-cost methods to get you started (or keep you on the right track) is providing professional development such as Registered Behavior Technician (RBT) training and equipping your team with the necessary, mobile-friendly tools to make their on-the-go job easier.


Rethink Behavioral Health provides an intuitive and comprehensive solution to scale your ABA business and ensure client success.

Our one-stop-shop platform offers both Clinical and Practice Management tools along with RBT Training, VB-MAPP licenses, and more than 1500 resources/materials as curriculum pieces.

Schedule a demo today at your convenience!

References:

  1. Schulz, R., Greenley, J.R., & Brown, R. (1995). Organization, management, and client effects on staff burnout. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 34, 333-345
  2. Waters, J.E. (1999). The impact of work resources on job stress among correctional treatment staff. Journal of Addictions and Offender Counseling, 20, 26-34
  3. Bakker, A.B. & Costa, P.L. (2014). Chronic job burnout and daily functioning: a theoretical analysis. Burnout Research (1), 112-119.

Businesspeople looking at paper charts and a macbook

New Category 1 CPT Codes for Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Services

rethink-vbmapp-promo Category 1 CPT Codes

Anthony Porcelli, Manager of Billing Services for Rethink Behavioral Health, had the pleasure of attending Dr. Wayne Fisher’s workshop on the new Category 1 CPT Codes for ABA Services, which will be effective January 1, 2019.

I split the workshop into 3 sections:

  1. Interpreting the new Category 1 CPT Codes
  2. Suggestions to help valuate the codes when negotiating rates with payers
  3. The work was undertaken to get the new Category 1 CPT Codes accepted by the American Medical Association (AMA)

The two great advantages I see with the new codes are that they are broken up into 15-minute units to allow for more efficient billing and the ongoing codes are no longer needed.

A quick crosswalk for the more commonly used codes is listed below and more detailed descriptions can be found here.

Old Category 3 CodeNew Category 1 Code
0359T97151
0360T – 0361T97152
0364T – 0365T97153
0368T – 0369T97155
0370T97156
0371T97157

A key talking point of the workshop involved valuating the codes when negotiating rates with payers.

When negotiating rates it is important to demonstrate to payers the amount of work that goes into each service.

For instance, when negotiating rates for a technician appointment (0364T – 0365T) providers should mention the training that is involved between the BCBA and the tech before the appointment, the work that goes on during the actual appointment, and the interpretation of data and session notes created afterward.

To do this, Dr. Fisher suggested that providers consider each CPT Code in 3 parts:

  • Pre-Service
  • Intra-Service
  • Post-Service

Pre-Service includes everything that goes on before the appointment takes place such as training staff and writing protocols.

Intra-Service consists of the work that goes on during the actual appointment itself while Post-Service is the work that happens after a session is completed such as writing progress notes and reviewing data.

By doing this, the provider can adequately describe the full scope of work that goes into each appointment.

A further example is provided below for what goes into a Support/Technician Appointment:

0364T – 0365T

Pre-Service Work

  1. BCBA: Trains a technician to perform the service.
  2. RBT: Attends trainings with BCBA. Reviews patient medical records. Creates materials for sessions.

Intra-Service Work

  1. RBT: Works with client based on protocols created by BCBA.

Post-Service

  1. RBT: Writes session notes. Communicates with BCBA as needed about sessions.
  2. BCBA: Reviews/Approves session notes. Interprets data. Updates treatment plan.

Next Steps

The last piece of the workshop involved discussion on the next steps that Dr. Fisher and his group would be working on involving the new Category 1 CPT Codes.

The first order of business for the group is releasing a “Tool Kit” for providers to help valuate their services when getting ready to negotiate with payers.

Dr. Fisher and his team will also work with the AMA to address the issue of billing for both the RBT and BCBA during overlapping service times.

He believes providers should be able to bill for both services concurrently because the responsibilities of each professional during the mutual session are different.

In Summary

In summation, I believe the new codes will positively affect the ABA world and simplify the billing process.

Since the ongoing codes have been eliminated, there will be less line errors during billing, leading to faster payments and less back-and-forth interaction with the insurance companies so that providers can spend more time with their clients.

Also, since the new codes have been assigned category 1 status, I hope that payers will be more uniform with their interpretations of their use which will also make for improved efficiency in billing.

rethink-promo- Category 1 CPT Codes

From scheduling the appointment to providing resources for treatment and tracking progress to getting paid - Rethink Behavioral Health will completely support you.

No more juggling systems.

Full Features

Our complete platform features:

  • Billing & Full Revenue Cycle Management (RCM) features electronic claims submission & remittances, eligibility verification, patient statements and payments portal, financial reporting, and more!
  • Staff Training & Resources on-demand, self-paced RBT Training and access to thousands of printable resources.
  • Clinical Programming & Data Collection spend less time on administrative tasks with robust tools for assessment, treatment planning, data collection and progress reporting.
  • Advanced Scheduling Tool Easy appointment set up, view multiple staff & client schedules at once, seamless controls prevent coding and scheduling errors, capture session notes and parent signatures.

Schedule a demo today at your convenience!